“To Love Others, You Must Love Yourself:” An Art Exhibit Review

by Lydia Carlson, Future Correspondent

Flash glares in mirrors.  Rhinestone-adorned jeans.  Coy glances over shoulders.  Tramp stamps.  Hiked up tank tops.  Though these were all common to the point of being cliche in the year 2010 and years befiore, the recent installation at the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan has piqued the curiosity of many. Though not much is understood about the self-portraits due to the massive internet re-formatting of 2048, Anabelle Smith, curator of the exhibit, explained the purpose of these photos as “a digital mating ritual.  As far as we can tell, they are meant to display a primitive urge in terms of the modern times, posted for all to see on the now-defunct myspace.com.”

Though some would argue a world without Myspace has its advantages, Smith mourns its loss. “It’d be such a fascinating glimpse into a time when people still had distinctly different faces.  With the Uniformity Act of 2050, it has since been difficult to come across people who have been able to escape the extensive cosmetic procedures that everyone goes through at 21.  These intimate and intriguing self-portraits harken back to a time when high self-esteem was not only existent, but encouraged.” The exhibit, entitled “To Love Others, You Must Love Yourself: A Study in Situational Narcissism” opened in January of 2098 to rave reviews. The New York Times called it “beautiful” and at the same time “a chilling reminder of the travesty of individuality.”  The self-portraits (some nude), acquired from a miraculously restored external hard drive unearthed from a basement in Newark, have not seen the light of day since 2048. The exhibit will be open until August of 2098, extended because of popular demand.

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